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Description of coastal employment:

The total coastal employment is the number of jobs in coastal communities. Businesses in coastal counties employ tens of millions of people nationally. This includes hundreds of thousands of ocean-dependent businesses that pay over $100 billion in wages annually. Many coastal and ocean amenities attracting visitors are free, generating no direct employment, wages, or gross domestic product. However, these “nonmarket” features are key drivers for many coastal businesses. We present data for all regions.

 

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes. The 2021 Data update will occur in November 2021 - this indicator will be updated as soon as possible after.

Alaska

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Alaska region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Alaska’s coastal employment has been relatively steady between 2014 - 2018, with no clear trend and no substantial difference from historical patterns.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 85 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for Alaska was higher than 85% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

 

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

Hawaiʻi-Pacific Islands

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Hawaii-Pacific Islands region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Hawaiʻi’s average coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 was substantially above historical levels, although no trend is apparent over that same period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 90 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for Hawaii and the Pacific Islands was higher than 90% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source :

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

California Current

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the California Current region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Average coastal employment in the California Current ecosystem between 2014 and 2018 was substantially above historical levels, with an increasing trend over that period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 90 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for the California Current was higher than 90% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

Gulf of Mexico

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Gulf of Mexico region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Average coastal employment along the Gulf of Mexico between 2014 and 2018 was substantially above historical levels, although no trend is apparent over that same period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 90 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for the Gulf of Mexico was higher than 90% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

Caribbean

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Caribbean region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Average coastal employment within the U.S. Caribbean between 2014 and 2018 was substantially below historical levels, with a decreasing trend over that period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 6 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for the US Caribbean was higher than only 6% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

Southeast

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Southeast US region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Average coastal employment within the Southeast between 2014 and 2018 was substantially above historical levels, although no trend is apparent over that same period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 90 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for the Southeast US was higher than 90% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

Northeast

graph of coastal employment/labor force for the Northeast US region from 1980-2020

Values correspond to total employment in all industries in a given region

 

Description of time series:

Average coastal employment within the Northeast between 2014 and 2018 was substantially above historical levels, although no trend is apparent over that same period.  

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 90 indicates that coastal employment between 2014 and 2018 for the Northeast US was higher than 90% of all years between 1990 and 2018.

 

Extreme Gauge values:

A value of zero on the gauge means that the average coastal employment level over the last 5 years of data was below any annual employment level up until that point, while a value of 100 would indicate the average over that same period was above any annual employment level up until that point.

Data Source:

Coastal employment numbers were downloaded from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ quarterly census of employment and wages, filtered to present only coastal county values using the Census Bureau’s list of coastal counties within each state. Of note is that these data fail to include self-employed individuals. Coastal county employment numbers were then summed within each region for reporting purposes.

 

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