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Description of Seabirds:

Seabirds are a vital part of marine ecosystems and valuable indicators of an ecosystem’s status.  Seabirds are attracted to fishing vessels and frequently get hooked or entangled in fishing gear, especially longline fisheries. This is a common threat to seabirds. Depending on the geographic region, fishermen in the United States often interact with albatross, cormorants, gannet, loons, pelicans, puffins, gulls, storm-petrels, shearwaters, terns, and many other species. We track seabirds because of their importance to marine food webs, but also as an indication of efficient fishing practices.  We present estimates of seabird abundance in the Alaska, California Current, Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions.

 

Data:

Data for Alaska, California Current, and the Gulf of Mexico were obtained from the regional NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program teams that produce indicators and Ecosystem Status Report. For more information see https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/. Seabird count and transect length data for the Northeast were extracted from the Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (AMAPPS) annual reports. Counts were summed and divided by the sum of the transect length in nautical miles. For more information see https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/psb/AMAPPS/

 

Alaska

East Bering Sea subregion

graph of seabird abundance for the Alaska region from 1980-2020

Description of time series:

Between 2014 and 2018 the seabird breeding index showed a significant downward trend.

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 13 indicates that between 2014 and 2018 the seabird breeding index in Alaska (Eastern Bering Sea) was much lower than the median of all breeding index values between 1996 and 2018

 

Description of Seabirds:

Seabirds are a vital part of marine ecosystems and valuable indicators of an ecosystem’s status.  Seabirds are attracted to fishing vessels and frequently get hooked or entangled in fishing gear, especially longline fisheries. This is a common threat to seabirds. Depending on the geographic region, fishermen in the United States often interact with albatross, cormorants, gannet, loons, pelicans, puffins, gulls, storm-petrels, shearwaters, terns, and many other species. We track seabirds because of their importance to marine food webs, but also as an indication of efficient fishing practices.  We present estimates of seabird abundance in the Alaska, California Current, Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions.

Overall Scores means the following:

  • 0 - 10: The five-year seabirds average is very low compared to the median value.
  • 10 - 25: The five-year seabirds average is much lower than the median value.
  • 25 - 50: The five-year seabirds average is lower than the median value.
  • 50: The five-year seabirds average equals the median value.
  • 50 - 75: The five-year seabirds average is higher than the median value.
  • 75 - 90: The five-year seabirds average is much higher than the median value.
  • 90 - 100: The five-year seabirds average is very high compared to the median value.

 

Data:

Data for Alaska, California Current, and the Gulf of Mexico were obtained from the regional NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program teams that produce indicators and Ecosystem Status Report. For more information see https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/. Seabird count and transect length data for the Northeast were extracted from the Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (AMAPPS) annual reports. Counts were summed and divided by the sum of the transect length in nautical miles. For more information see https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/psb/AMAPPS/

 

California Current

Cassin’s Auklet Spring Southern California Current

graph of seabird abundance for the Alaska region from 1980-2020

Description of time series:

Between 2014 and 2018 the seabird density anomaly showed no significant trend.

 

 

Description of gauge:

The Gauge value of 47 indicates that between 2014 and 2018 the seabird density anomaly (Cassins Auklet spring) in the California Current region (Southern) was lower than the median of all density anomaly values between 1987 and 2018.

 

 

Description of Seabirds:

Seabirds are a vital part of marine ecosystems and valuable indicators of an ecosystem’s status.  Seabirds are attracted to fishing vessels and frequently get hooked or entangled in fishing gear, especially longline fisheries. This is a common threat to seabirds. Depending on the geographic region, fishermen in the United States often interact with albatross, cormorants, gannet, loons, pelicans, puffins, gulls, storm-petrels, shearwaters, terns, and many other species. We track seabirds because of their importance to marine food webs, but also as an indication of efficient fishing practices.  We present estimates of seabird abundance in the Alaska, California Current, Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions.

Overall Scores means the following:

  • 0 - 10: The five-year seabirds average is very low compared to the median value.
  • 10 - 25: The five-year seabirds average is much lower than the median value.
  • 25 - 50: The five-year seabirds average is lower than the median value.
  • 50: The five-year seabirds average equals the median value.
  • 50 - 75: The five-year seabirds average is higher than the median value.
  • 75 - 90: The five-year seabirds average is much higher than the median value.
  • 90 - 100: The five-year seabirds average is very high compared to the median value.

 

Data:

Data for Alaska, California Current, and the Gulf of Mexico were obtained from the regional NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program teams that produce indicators and Ecosystem Status Report. For more information see https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/. Seabird count and transect length data for the Northeast were extracted from the Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (AMAPPS) annual reports. Counts were summed and divided by the sum of the transect length in nautical miles. For more information see https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/psb/AMAPPS/

 

Gulf of Mexico

graph of seabird abundance for the Gulf of Mexico region from 1980-2020

Description of time series:

Between 2000 and 2014 the relative abundance of seabirds showed no significant trend.

 

 

Description of gauge:

The Gauge value of 26 indicates that between 2010 and 2014 the relative abundance of seabirds in the Gulf of Mexico was much lower than the mean of all the relative abundance values between 1981 and 2018.

 

 

Description of Seabirds:

Seabirds are a vital part of marine ecosystems and valuable indicators of an ecosystem’s status.  Seabirds are attracted to fishing vessels and frequently get hooked or entangled in fishing gear, especially longline fisheries. This is a common threat to seabirds. Depending on the geographic region, fishermen in the United States often interact with albatross, cormorants, gannet, loons, pelicans, puffins, gulls, storm-petrels, shearwaters, terns, and many other species. We track seabirds because of their importance to marine food webs, but also as an indication of efficient fishing practices.  We present estimates of seabird abundance in the Alaska, California Current, Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions.

Overall Scores means the following:

  • 0 - 10: The five-year seabirds average is very low compared to the median value.
  • 10 - 25: The five-year seabirds average is much lower than the median value.
  • 25 - 50: The five-year seabirds average is lower than the median value.
  • 50: The five-year seabirds average equals the median value.
  • 50 - 75: The five-year seabirds average is higher than the median value.
  • 75 - 90: The five-year seabirds average is much higher than the median value.
  • 90 - 100: The five-year seabirds average is very high compared to the median value.

 

Data:

Data for Alaska, California Current, and the Gulf of Mexico were obtained from the regional NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program teams that produce indicators and Ecosystem Status Report. For more information see https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/. Seabird count and transect length data for the Northeast were extracted from the Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (AMAPPS) annual reports. Counts were summed and divided by the sum of the transect length in nautical miles. For more information see https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/psb/AMAPPS/

 

Northeast

graph of seabird abundance for the Northeast US region from 1980-2020

Description of time series:

Between 2011 and 2018 the seabird count per nautical mile showed no significant trend.

 

 

Description of gauge:

The gauge value of 71 indicates that the number of seabirds counted per mile in the Northeast between 2014 and 2018 was greater than the median number of all seabirds counted between 2011 and 2018.

 

 

Description of Seabirds:

Seabirds are a vital part of marine ecosystems and valuable indicators of an ecosystem’s status.  Seabirds are attracted to fishing vessels and frequently get hooked or entangled in fishing gear, especially longline fisheries. This is a common threat to seabirds. Depending on the geographic region, fishermen in the United States often interact with albatross, cormorants, gannet, loons, pelicans, puffins, gulls, storm-petrels, shearwaters, terns, and many other species. We track seabirds because of their importance to marine food webs, but also as an indication of efficient fishing practices.  We present estimates of seabird abundance in the Alaska, California Current, Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions.

Overall Scores means the following:

  • 0 - 10: The five-year seabirds average is very low compared to the median value.
  • 10 - 25: The five-year seabirds average is much lower than the median value.
  • 25 - 50: The five-year seabirds average is lower than the median value.
  • 50: The five-year seabirds average equals the median value.
  • 50 - 75: The five-year seabirds average is higher than the median value.
  • 75 - 90: The five-year seabirds average is much higher than the median value.
  • 90 - 100: The five-year seabirds average is very high compared to the median value.

 

Data:

Data for Alaska, California Current, and the Gulf of Mexico were obtained from the regional NOAA Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Program teams that produce indicators and Ecosystem Status Report. For more information see https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/. Seabird count and transect length data for the Northeast were extracted from the Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species (AMAPPS) annual reports. Counts were summed and divided by the sum of the transect length in nautical miles. For more information see https://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/psb/AMAPPS/

 

Resources

Atlantic Marine Assessment Program for Protected Species

We conduct surveys and develop abundance and distribution models to better understand how protected species such as whales, dolphins, and sea turtles use our waters.